Regulation - LGIC

Proposed Regulatory Amendments to Ontario Regulation 202/94 (General) made under the Pharmacy Act, 1991

Regulation Number(s):
Ontario Regulation 202/94
Instrument Type:
Regulation - LGIC
Bill or Act:
Pharmacy Act, 1991
Summary of Proposal:
College Introduction

In Ontario, the regulation of health professions is based on a self-governance model. There are 26 health regulatory colleges governing 28 health professions under the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991 (RHPA) and their respective health profession Acts.

Under the RHPA and the Pharmacy Act, 1991, the Ontario College of Pharmacists (College) is responsible for governing the profession of pharmacy in Ontario. Under these Acts, the College has the authority to make regulations on a variety of subject matters, including regulations regarding the performance of controlled acts authorized to the profession. The proposed regulation amendments are subject to prior review by the Minister of Health and the approval of the Lieutenant Governor in Council (LGIC).

Summary

As part of the Ontario 2019 budget, the government announced that it will enable regulated health professionals to use their education and training more effectively by expanding the scope of practice for certain regulated health professionals. This commitment was further iterated in the 2019 Ontario Economic Outlook and Fiscal Review.

The Council of the College is amending its regulations to allow pharmacists to:
1. Administer the influenza vaccine to children as young as 2 years old;
2. Renew prescriptions in quantities of up to a year's supply;
3. Administer certain substances by injection and/or inhalation for purposes that are in addition to patient education and demonstration.

The College's proposal is not final. The ministry will consider the feedback received prior to bringing it forward to the Minister of Health for her review and prior to seeking the approval of the Lieutenant Governor in Council.
Analysis of Regulatory Impact:
Pharmacists will incur costs to complete additional continuing education to safely administer the influenza vaccine to children as young as 2 years old. In addition, the government's Universal Influenza Immunization Program will incur costs to supply pharmacies with the injectable influenza vaccine for the population aged 2-4 years.

Allowing pharmacists to renew prescriptions in quantities of up to a year's supply and administer substances for therapeutic treatment will not result in any costs to pharmacists or pharmacies.

Further Information:
Proposal Number:
20-HLTC025
Posting Date:
June 12, 2020
Comments Due Date:
July 27, 2020
Contact Address:
N/A